Date of Award

2020-01-01

Degree Name

Doctor of Philosophy

Department

History

Advisor(s)

Jeffery P. Shepherd

Abstract

"The Manliness to Defend Themselves: Race and Civilian/Indigenous Warfare in New Mexico, 1598-1898," explores three-hundred years of warfare between the civilian population and Native peoples in New Mexico. For centuries the regimes of New Spain and Mexico had utilized New Mexican civilians to battle independent Indians. A culture of warfare had subsequently emerged among the civilian population. As the United States proclaimed sovereignty over New Mexico, military officials attempted to put an end to the practice of warfare by civilians, yet would be hard-pressed to do so. The ideas of Anglo American officials concerning race and citizenship conflicted with the custom of warfare by civilians against Native peoples in New Mexico in large part because local militias consisted primarily of ethnic Mexicans and Pueblo Indians. Attempts by the United States to secure a monopoly of force in the region by dismantling the centuries-long custom of civilian militarization led to a disconnect and conflict between the territorial government, the multi-ethnic inhabitants, and the U.S. military.

Language

en

Provenance

Received from ProQuest

File Size

367 pages

File Format

application/pdf

Rights Holder

Ian Anson Lee

Available for download on Sunday, June 19, 2022

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